Sunday, September 24, 2006

HTML: What is nbsp

For several weeks now I've been getting an error message about half the time when I publish my blog. It says "error" and if you click on more details it says "file not found" but if I hit the back button it takes me back into the post and I've always been able to publish.

It is freaking me out, so I took a look at the template in Firefox web developer, where I hear that things show up in red when there are errors. The only things I have in red are two places where the letters nbsp show up red. Both places they are inside brackets where text should go like this:

>nbsp<

(Even to my totally html challenged brain, they don't look like they should be there.)

I have no idea what nbsp is and why it is there. Can anyone tell me if this could be what's causing the error message, and what I should do about it. Should I just delete them?

(I'm seriously html challenged, so speak slowly and use small words if you can.)


Thanks for any help anyone can give!!

This Post was written by Kalyn from Kalyn's Kitchen

4 comments:

Joe Kissell said...

The characters nbsp stand for non-breaking space. In HTML, this is supposed to be written as   (an ampersand character (&) followed by nbsp followed by a semicolon (;)). A Web browser sees that string of characters and turns it into a space. This type of space character is used, for example, when you want to be sure that two words always stay together on the same line, even when they have a space between them. It's also used when you want to have some sort of (invisible) character to improve the spacing or alignment of a line.

If you don't need the spaces, you can just delete the whole "nbsp" thing. But try putting an ampersand immediately before the n and a semicolon immediately after. That might solve the problem too.

Joe Kissell said...

The characters nbsp stand for non-breaking space. In HTML, this is supposed to be written as &nbsp; (an ampersand character (&) followed by nbsp followed by a semicolon (;)). A Web browser sees that string of characters and turns it into a space. This type of space character is used, for example, when you want to be sure that two words always stay together on the same line, even when they have a space between them. It's also used when you want to have some sort of (invisible) character to improve the spacing or alignment of a line.

If you don't need the spaces, you can just delete the whole "nbsp" thing. But try putting an ampersand immediately before the n and a semicolon immediately after. That might solve the problem too.

Joe Kissell said...

(Sorry, first time around Blogger ate my HTML! Feel free to delete that comment, and this one!)

Kalyn said...

Joe, thank you so much. I will try deleting it tonight when I get home from work and see what happens. And I apprecite the simple explanation! I even understood it!